A Book for Shakespeare Plays and Pageants; A Treasury of Elizabethan and Shakespearean Detail for Producers, Stage Managers, Actors, Artists, and Students

A Book for Shakespeare Plays and Pageants; A Treasury of Elizabethan and Shakespearean Detail for Producers, Stage Managers, Actors, Artists, and Students

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...were announced subject to this. In London they took place every day except Sunday, and were in the afternoon. They were supposed to be ended before darkness came on, beginning about three o'clock, and lasting for two hours or more. Playbills were posted about the city, by some theatres, if not by all, and a flag on the building gave local sign of an intended play. The beginning of the performance was announced by three blasts of a trumpet, and immediately afterwards the prologue appeared on the stage to entreat the favour of the audience for the play. At the public theatres the price for admission began at one penny and reached as much as a half crown,3 the pit being unprovided with seats except for those who were willing to pay an extra sixpence for a stool. At Blackfriars the more expensive seats cost as much as eight shillings. Structure of the Theatres. Public Theatres. The structure of the first public theatres is largely explained by the places where plays were given before any theatres were built. These places were the innyards, the courtyards of castles and the amphitheatres or rings designed for the baiting of animals. In the old innyards the conditions had been very simple and 3 2s 6d, or about sixty-two cents. yet very practical both for actors and for audience. The religious plays had been given on wagons drawn into the court or yard with the actors upon them, and the rabble had massed themselves in front of these wagons, standing on the ground or sitting on stools or benches to watch the play, while the more fortunate looked down from the balconies or windows surrounding the yard. Most of the public theatres adopted all of these features, modifying and supplementing them as necessity required. The playhouse was uncovered in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236540530
  • 9781236540539