Book of Standards

Book of Standards

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...with one-half its volume of oxygen, there is produced an amount of water vapor which will occupy the same volume as that which was occupied by the hydrogen gas when at the same temperature and pressure. Saturation Point of Vapors. A vapor that is not near the saturation point behaves like a gas under changes of temperature and pressure; but if it is sufficiently compressed or cooled, it reaches a point where it begins to condense; it then no longer obeys the same laws as a gas, but its pressure cannot be increased by diminishing the size cf the vessel containing it, but remains constant, except when the temperature is changed. The only gas that can prevent a liquid evaporating seems to be its own vapor. Dalton's Law of Gaseous Pressures. Every portion of a mass of gas inclosed in a vessel contributes to the pressure against the sides of the vessel the same amount that it would have exerted by itself had no other gas been present. Mixtures of Vapors and Gases. The pressure exerted against the interior of a vessel by a given quantity of a perfect gas inclosed in it is the sum of the pressures which any number of parts into which such quantity might be divided would exert separately, if each were inclosed in a vessel of the same bulk alone, at the same temperature. Although this law is not exactly true for any actual gas, it is very nearly true for many. Thus if 0.080728 pound of air at 32 F., being inclosed in a vessel of 1 cubic foot capacity, exerts a pressure of one atmosphere, or 14.7 pounds, on each square inch of the interior of the vessel, then will each additional 0.080728 pound of air which is inclosed, at 32 F., in the same vessel, produce very nearly an additional atmosphere of pressure. The same law is applicable to mixtures of gases of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581563
  • 9781236581563