The Book of the Rabbit; History, Variations, Uses, Points, Management, Selection, Mating, Breeding, Exhibiting, Judging, Treatment of the Diseases, Rabbit-Farming, and Much Other Information Bearing on Rabbits and Rabbit-Keeping ...

The Book of the Rabbit; History, Variations, Uses, Points, Management, Selection, Mating, Breeding, Exhibiting, Judging, Treatment of the Diseases, Rabbit-Farming, and Much Other Information Bearing on Rabbits and Rabbit-Keeping ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...use in the case of young rabbits. The food of the Polish may be much the same as that given to any other variety of rabbit, although it should be remembered that this variety is very subject to looseness, as already mentioned, and the supply of succulent food should therefore be kept under the usual mark. The best way to guard against these unpleasant complaints, with their more or less dangerous concomitants, is not to give such food as lettuce or cabbage, the latter especially, in large quantities. A few dried beech-leaves or heath, if the rabbits will eat it, will always be good; and the more palatable green food should be gathered over night, and given a little dry, to avoid the evil effects of too much moisture. A little fresh green food may be given as a treat, but not to much extent, and the rabbits will soon begin to relish the dried leaves almost as much as the fresh. Young grass and wheat, clover, tares, vetches, and the like, are all excellent, and may be obtained at a nominal price. It is a circumstance that has been iproved by experience, that when herbs of this description form the vegetable portion of the diet, the smell of the excrement is very much less obnoxious; and as one of the greatest and commonest outcries against rabbit-keeping is their smell, every reasonable precaution should be adopted to make this as slight as possible, especially when the health of the rabbit may be improved at the same time and by the same means. The delicate bowels of the Polish should be borne in mind when dealing out the farinaceous food, as it is found that diarrhoea may be sometimes caused by injudicious corn feeding, as well as by overdoing the greenmeat. Oats are good at any time, _ and may be given always, with slight variations in..show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 272g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236902041
  • 9781236902047