The Book of the Lantern; Being a Practical Guide to the Working of the Optical (or Magic) Lantern, with Full and Precise Directions for Making and Colouring Lantern Pictures

The Book of the Lantern; Being a Practical Guide to the Working of the Optical (or Magic) Lantern, with Full and Precise Directions for Making and Colouring Lantern Pictures

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ... as presented to the eye, are "far, far away.' His natural impulse would be to carry his camera farther from the object, but a blank wall behind him forbids him to do this. But with a shorter focus-lens, which should screw into the flange fitted on his camera, the accident can be immediately remedied, and he can proceed on his way rejoicing. This same difficulty has occurred to me time after time, in the case of country churches having small burinl-grounds shut in on every side by foliage. From no point can a view of the building be focussed on the glass except by using a lens of very short focus. Very often the conditions are reversed, and the photographer finds himself before a scene with some obstacle in front of him which forbids nearer approach, and the image on the focussing-screen is quite insignificant. Here the obvious course is to screw off the front lens of his combination, and to treat the back one as a long-focus single lens. Of course, the camera must be extended to double its normal length, and no amateur should possess a camera that will not do so, shonld occasion require it. The most experienced workers often obtain a negative full of brilliancy and delicate detail, but with a very thin sky, --a sky so thin that if a lantern-slide were taken from it raw, so to speak, we should have in it a very good representation of a November fog. There are several ways of obviating this difficulty. In exposing it before the gasflame it should, like all thin negatives, be taken severe! feet distant, so that the time of exposure may perhaps extend to twenty seconds or more. During this time keep the sky portion covered with a piece of card which has been cut in vandykes all along the edge next the horizon, but do not keep it still, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 66 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 136g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236864344
  • 9781236864345