The Book of Chess; Containing the Rudiments of the Game, and Elementary Analyses of the Most Popular Openings. Exemplified in Games Actually Played by the Greatest Masters Including Staunton's Analysis of the King's and Queen's Gambits,

The Book of Chess; Containing the Rudiments of the Game, and Elementary Analyses of the Most Popular Openings. Exemplified in Games Actually Played by the Greatest Masters Including Staunton's Analysis of the King's and Queen's Gambits,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1852 edition. Excerpt: ...K. P. two. 2. K. Kt. to B. 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B. 3d. 3. K. B. to Q. B. 4th. 3. K. B. to Q. B. 4th. NOTES TO GAME III. (a) Walker, in his "Art of Chess-Play," says of this move that it has been condemned without sufficient cause. He pronounces it perfectly safe, though inferior to Kt. to K. B. 3d. He gives the following analysis: First mode of play. 4. Q. to K. 2d. 5. Q. P. two. 5. B. to Kt. 3d (best). 6. If yon take P. with P., he retakes with Kt., and the game is even, whether you change Kts. or not. Q. P. advances. 6. Q. Kt. to Q. sq.--He may also go home with Kt. 7. Castles. 7. Q. P. one.---He will move K. B. P. two, and the game is equal. The advance of your Q. P. so far, weakens your situation. Second mode of play. 4. Q. to K. 2d. 5. Castles. 5. Q. P. one. 6. Q. P. two. 6. K. B. to Kt. 3d. (best) 7. The game is even. If you play Q. B. to K. Kt. 5th, he replies with K Kt. to B. 3d. If you advance P. on Kt., the latter retreats, either home or to Q. sq. Black will persist in not taking Q. P. withK. P., because in so doing he would enlarge the activity of your Q. Kt., by opening to his range your Q. B. 3d sq. (6) After castling on the King's side, the advance of this Pawn is usually attended with some risk. (c) A very attacking move, which should probably have been replied to with K. B. P. one. (Z) The attack consequent on this exchange is so severe, that the game may now be considered as forced. NOTES TO GAME IV. (a) Popert wins the game; nevertheless the strongest reply here was B. to Q. 5th, sure of regaining the Pawn. Walker, in his "Art of Chess-Play," dismisses this method of continuing the Giuoco Piano with the following brief summary: While. Black. 1. K. P. two. 1. The same. 2. K. Kt. to B. 3d. 2. Q. Kt. to B. 3d. 3....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236511255
  • 9781236511256