Book 2. Personal Experiences, Observations, and Studies in Japan, 1870-1875. Book 3. Supplementary Chapters, Including History to the Beginning of 1906

Book 2. Personal Experiences, Observations, and Studies in Japan, 1870-1875. Book 3. Supplementary Chapters, Including History to the Beginning of 1906

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...in the refectory, some bringing their own food. The priests very politely took me through the rear part of the temple, beyond the splendid altar, where I could see the vast crowd, and through the quarters occupied by the resident bonzes. The sight of so many thousand faces of people with hands clasped in prayer, with their 1-osaries, murmuring their petitions ("Namu Amida Butsfi") in the great hall; then of the hundreds of hungry people feeding; children and families resting--many of them had walked from ten to twenty miles; the cooks in the fire-light, begrimed with the smoke and sweat of the kitchen; the waiters hurrying to and fro; the receiving and counting of money, made a picture of Buddhism in its popular phases I can never forget. January 10th.--Some months ago I addressed a communication to the Minister of Public Instruction in Tokio, urging the establishment of a polytechnic school, giving plans and a few details. Evidently such an enterprise has already been determined upon. To-day I received a letter from the Mayor of Tokio, intimating that I was to be invited to the capital to fill a position in such a school. Another letter, by the same mail, from the Minister of Education, through the foreign superintendent of the Imperial College, invited me to fill one of the professorships in the polytechnic school (Shem Mon Gakko) about to be formed. An immediate answer is expected. January 11th.--I was called to the ken-cho to-day, the sanji expressing their urgent wish that I should remain in Fukui, stating also that the citizens of Fukui, anticipating the invitation from Tokio, had petitioned the ken-c/Lo officials to keep the American teacher in Fukui, if possible. Having, however, lost most of my best friends and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236927281
  • 9781236927286