The Bonesetter's Daughter

The Bonesetter's Daughter

3.98 (107,415 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

"The Bonesetter's Daughter dramatically chronicles the tortured, devoted relationship between LuLing Young and her daughter Ruth. . . . A strong novel, filled with idiosyncratic, sympathetic characters, haunting images, historical complexity, significant contemporary themes, and suspenseful mystery."
-Los Angeles Times "TAN AT HER BEST . . . Rich and hauntingly forlorn . . . The writing is so exacting and unique in its detail."
-San Francisco Chronicle

"For Tan, the true keeper of memory is language, and so the novel is layered with stories that have been written down-by mothers for their daughters, passing along secrets that cannot be said out loud but must not be forgotten."
-The New York Times Book Review

"AMY TAN [HAS] DONE IT AGAIN. . . . The Bonesetter's Daughter tells a compelling tale of family relationships; it layers and stirs themes of secrets, ambiguous meanings, cultural complexity and self-identity; and it resonates with metaphor and symbol."
-The Denver Post
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Product details

  • Paperback | 416 pages
  • 113 x 181 x 29mm | 204g
  • Random House Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0804114986
  • 9780804114981
  • 21,559

Flap copy

""The Bonesetter's Daughter dramatically chronicles the tortured, devoted relationship between LuLing Young and her daughter Ruth. . . . A strong novel, filled with idiosyncratic, sympathetic characters, haunting images, historical complexity, significant contemporary themes, and suspenseful mystery."
-"Los Angeles Times
"TAN AT HER BEST . . . Rich and hauntingly forlorn . . . The writing is so exacting and unique in its detail."
-"San Francisco Chronicle
"For Tan, the true keeper of memory is language, and so the novel is layered with stories that have been written down-by mothers for their daughters, passing along secrets that cannot be said out loud but must not be forgotten."
-"The "New York Times Book Review
"AMY TAN [HAS] DONE IT AGAIN. . . . "The Bonesetter's Daughter tells a compelling tale of family relationships; it layers and stirs themes of secrets, ambiguous meanings, cultural complexity and self-identity; and it resonates with metaphor and symbol."
-"The Denver Post
show more

Review Text

""The Bonesetter's Daughter dramatically chronicles the tortured, devoted relationship between LuLing Young and her daughter Ruth. . . . A strong novel, filled with idiosyncratic, sympathetic characters, haunting images, historical complexity, significant contemporary themes, and suspenseful mystery."
-"Los Angeles Times
"TAN AT HER BEST . . . Rich and hauntingly forlorn . . . The writing is so exacting and unique in its detail."
-"San Francisco Chronicle
"For Tan, the true keeper of memory is language, and so the novel is layered with stories that have been written down-by mothers for their daughters, passing along secrets that cannot be said out loud but must not be forgotten."
-"The "New York Times Book Review
"AMY TAN [HAS] DONE IT AGAIN. . . . "The Bonesetter's Daughter tells a compelling tale of family relationships; it layers and stirs themes of secrets, ambiguous meanings, cultural complexity and self-identity; and it resonates with metaphor and symbol."
-"The Denver Post
show more

Review quote

"AS COMPELLING AS TAN'S FIRST BESTSELLER THE JOY LUCK CLUB. . . No one writes about mothers and daughters with more empathy than Amy Tan."
-The Philadelphia Inquirer "[AN] ABSORBING TALE OF THE MOTHER-DAUGHTER BOND . . . THIS BOOK SING[S] WITH EMOTION AND INSIGHT."
-People "POIGNANT AND BITTERSWEET . . . A STORY OF SECRETS AND REVELATION, ESTRANGEMENT AND RECONCILIATION."
-Rocky Mountain News
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About Amy Tan

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God's Wife, The Hundred Secret Senses, and two children's books, The Moon Lady and The Chinese Siamese Cat, which has been adapted as Sagwa, a PBS series for children. Tan was also the co-producer and co-screenwriter of the film version of The Joy Luck Club, and her essays and stories have appeared in numerous magazines and anthologies. Her work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. Tan, who has a master's degree in linguistics from San Jose University, has worked as a language specialist to programs serving children with developmental disabilities. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.
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Rating details

107,415 ratings
3.98 out of 5 stars
5 29% (31,529)
4 44% (47,255)
3 23% (24,337)
2 3% (3,552)
1 1% (742)

Our customer reviews

This is my first Amy Tan book. Having bought it at a sale (3 for $10), I was ecstatic to finally found one book I’ve been meaning to read for quite some time. The Bonesetter’s Daughter talks about the estranged relationship between mothers and daughters. It is about the women who shaped Ruth Young’s life. The story shows that it is not too late for people to forgive each other and themselves. The Bonesetter’s Daughter is bold and troublesome all at once. The first part focuses on Ruth, a workaholic in her mid 40s. It talks about Young with her life partner, Art and his two adolescent daughters, Dory and Fia. Things start to get complicated when Young finds out that her mother, Lu Ling, is showing signs of dementia. The late Precious Auntie, whose real identity shows later in the book, is a constant figment in Lu Ling’s life. The relationship between Ruth and Lu Ling is fustrating. There’s resentment and bitterness. The second part evolves to Lu Ling’s young life. Sisterly love. Marriage. Curses. Family secrets. I’m not a believer when it comes to superstitions; I find them silly. To quote from the book, it is bound by grudges, debt and love. The Bonesetter’s Daughter builds up slowly. It reads well and is rich with humanity. The last 70 pages offers commentary on forgiveness and pride- as Ruth finally understands what her mother and grandmother has done for her. Memorable Quotes from The Bonesetter’s Daughter: “After all, Bao Bomu says, what is the past but what we choose to remember?” “But I don’t have anything left inside of me to figure out where I fit in or what I want. If I want anything, it’s to know what’s possible to want.” “Dementia was like a truth serum.”show more
by Tan Hui Ling Priscilla
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