Blast Roasting, Lead Melting and Refining, Elements of Electrometallurgy, Miscellaneous Electrometallurgical Processes, Electrometallurgy of Copper, E

Blast Roasting, Lead Melting and Refining, Elements of Electrometallurgy, Miscellaneous Electrometallurgical Processes, Electrometallurgy of Copper, E

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1911 edition. Excerpt: ...a difficult one, because suitable and at the same time inexpensive diaphragms have not as yet been obtained. This trouble, though, seems to be solved in the Cohen process by doing away with diaphragms. An especially constructed bath is used in which the cupric chloride formed at the anode, having a higher specific gravity than the chloride solution, settles at the bottom, where it forms a distinct layer, into which the anode extends. The cathode is short and does not reach the highest level of this layer, which is kept. from accumulating by a siphon discharge. It is quite probable that the obstacles to the Hoepfner process will be overcome to a great extent. ELECTROLYTIC REFINING OF SILVER on DORE BULLION CLASSIFICATION OF PROCESSES 9. The electrolytic methods for refining silver are steadily increasing in favor, owing to their cheapness and the remarkable purity of the product obtained. The metal is particularly well adapted to electrolytic refining, and especially to those methods that depend on the solution of the silver at the anode and its redeposition at the cathode. The processes for the recovery of silver from its alloys may be divided into two classes. In the first class the silver is but a small' percentage of the metals of the alloy; the latter is therefore electrolyzed for the deposition of the principal metal. The silver and gold in such instances are not dissolved in the electrolyte, but are separated out at the anode in an insoluble form, called slimes, mud, or residues. This is the case with the lead bullion of the Roessler-Edelmann process. But the crusts produced by the Parkes process contain too much lead to give satisfactory results by electrolytic methods. The silver and gold in these residues are not pure, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 126 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236945476
  • 9781236945471