The Blast Furnace and the Manufacture of Pig Iron; An Elementary Treatise for the Use of the Metallurgical Student and the Furnaceman

The Blast Furnace and the Manufacture of Pig Iron; An Elementary Treatise for the Use of the Metallurgical Student and the Furnaceman

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...of the oxygen has been removed at that depth, thus Fe, O3 = 2 FeO-f-(), whereas Bell has shown that fully 85 per cent. is removed during the first ten or twelve feet. Moreover the diagram shows no metallic iron before the depth of 26 feet. while Bell found metal above 10 feet depth. Bell states also that carbon deposition ceases at red heat and owing to the action of CO2 little or none reaches the bosh, but the diagram indicates that it persists even down to the tuyeres. The decomposition of limestone is here represented as sudden and complete at a depth of 32 feet. at which point the CO2 column has its origin, whereas Bell's analyses showed the presence of CO., and undecomposed limestone at depths of 60 to 70 feet. Bell's analyses also sl: ow that cyanides disappear completely from the gases before they have risen 45 feet from the tuyeres. THE CARBON RATIO. A fair average composition by volume of the gases which escape from a blast furnace is as follows: 'O. CO.. H. OH, . N. 24.5 12.0 1.25 0.25 02.0 CO It was formerly believed that the ratio, -, -could not fall below 2, and proper reducing effect in the furnace be maintained. It has been shown repeatedly, however, that a furnace can be operated successfully for considerable periods with a ratio of 1.35 or less. This ratio of the unsaturated to the saturated carbon in the gases is of vital importance to the fuel economy. The heat liberated by the combustion of i pound of carbon, when burned to the state of complete oxidation, is 14,550 B. T. U., while that liberated by the unsaturated compound is only 4450 B. T. U. per pound. Since over three times the heat is produced by the combustion to CCX, it follows that the greater the proportion of CO2 in the gases, the more efficiently each pound of fuel has...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236574834
  • 9781236574831