The Birth of Judicial Politics in France

The Birth of Judicial Politics in France : The Constitutional Council in Comparative Perspective

4 (1 rating by Goodreads)
By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 3 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

The French Constitutional Council, a quasi-judicial body created at the dawn of the Fifth Republic, functioned in relative obscurity for almost two decades before emerging in the 1980s as a pivotal actor in the French policymaking process. Alec Stone focuses on how this once docile institution, through its practice of constitutional review, has become an important autonomous actor in the French political system. After examining the formal prohibition against judicial review in France, Stone illustrates how politicians and the Council have collaborated, often unintentionally and in the service of contradictory agendas, to enhance the Council's power significantly in the last decade. While the Council came to function as a third house of Parliament, the legislative work of the government and Parliament was "juridicized." Through a discussion of broad theoretical issues, Stone then expands the scope of his analysis to the politics of constitutional review in Germany, Spain, and Austria.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 320 pages
  • 162.6 x 238.3 x 26.2mm | 796.24g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • illustrations, tables
  • 0195070348
  • 9780195070347
  • 1,641,134

Back cover copy

The French Constitutional Council, a quasi-judicial body created at the dawn of the Fifth Republic, functioned in relative obscurity for almost two decades before emerging in the 1980s as a pivotal actor in the French policymaking process. Alec Stone focuses on how this once docile institution, through its practice of constitutional review, has become an important autonomous actor in the French political system. After examining the formal prohibition against judicial review in France, Stone illustrates how politicians and the Council have collaborated, often unintentionally and in the service of contradictory agendas, to enhance the Council's power significantly in the last decade. While the Council came to function as a third house of Parliament, the legislative work of the government and Parliament was "juridicized". Through a discussion of broad theoretical issues, Stone then expands the scope of his analysis to the politics of constitutional review in Germany, Spain, and Austria.show more

Review quote

`Alec Stone has written a comprehensive description of the inception and subsequent evolution of the French Constitutional Council, but he has also done much more ... He demonstrates that he is well-versed in the literature of comparative politics and he capably applies it to judicial institutions ... This is a rich book and one that can be profitably read by students of judicial and comparative politics and by those whose inclinations lie in jurisprudence and law ... I find the overall quality and value of the book to be most impressive.' West European Politics `The importance of this book lies not only in its detailed examination of the Council but in forcing us to rethink simplistic distinctions between legislative and judicial institutions; it is of considerable relevance to current debates on the British constitution.' Political Studiesshow more

Rating details

1 ratings
4 out of 5 stars
5 0% (0)
4 100% (1)
3 0% (0)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X