The Birds of Berwickshire; With Remarks on Their Local Distribution Migration, and Habits, and Also on the Folk-Lore, Proverbs, Popular Rhymes and Sayings Connected with Them Volume 2

The Birds of Berwickshire; With Remarks on Their Local Distribution Migration, and Habits, and Also on the Folk-Lore, Proverbs, Popular Rhymes and Sayings Connected with Them Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ...of this bird on Springfield farm, in Oldhamstocks parish, East-Lothian, on the western borders of Berwickshire,2 and that Mr. George Bolam states that on more than one occasion he has heard its call within "Berwick Bounds," in the fields adjoining the roads leading to Paxton and Chirnside, on the eastern borders of the county. He says: "Like the Corn Crake, Quails are most vociferous at sundown, and it is when the twilight has pretty far advanced on a fine summer evening, and when most other birds are silent, that their 'Plup, ' 'plup' is most noticeable." He adds that the note, which is often repeated two or three times in succession, somewhat resembles one of the sounds made by a Turkey Hen.3 The Quail is fond of frequenting grass and corn fields, where, on summer evenings, the peculiar cry of the male may be heard as he " clamours for his running mate." 4 I 1 Information from James Hunter, Esq. of Antonsbill. J Hiet. Ber. Nat. Club, vol. vii. p. 515. s Ibid. vol. x. pp. 392, 398. Thomson's Seasom--"Summer." It is sometimes seen by Partridge shooters in September, its flight being quick, and generally straight and low. While shooting at Rentonhall, near Haddington, in September 1869, I found a Quail amongst some standing barley; and I have seen bevies in the rye fields near Orleans in France, where the cry of this bird is thought to resemble the words "paye tes dettes!" M. Rolland mentions that poachers in France employ an instrument made of the skin of a mole to imitate its cry. "On appelle courcaillet un instrument dont se servent les braconniers pour attirer les cailles. II est forme" d'une peau de taupe cousue comme une outre et a laquelle est adapted une sorte de sifflet....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 104 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 200g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236884124
  • 9781236884121