Biographical Notices of Graduates of Yale College; Including Those Graduated in Classes Later Than 1815, Who Are Not Commemorated in the Annual Obituary Records

Biographical Notices of Graduates of Yale College; Including Those Graduated in Classes Later Than 1815, Who Are Not Commemorated in the Annual Obituary Records

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...1846, at the age of 39. George Champlin Tenney, the eldest child of the Rev. Dr. Caleb Jewett Tenney (Dartmouth Coll. 1801) and Ruth (Channing) Tenney, was baptized by the names of Samuel George Champlin, on October 8, 1809, by his father, in Newport, Rhode Island, where he was then pastor of the First Congregational Church. The father removed in 1816 to the Congregational Church in Wethersfield, Connecticut, whence the son entered College in 1826. He was a member of the Yale Law School in 1830-32, but his health soon failed. He was committed to the State Hospital for the Insane in Worcester, Massachusetts, in March, 1841, was transferred to the State Hospital in Northampton in August, 1858, and discharged unimproved in August, 1875. He died in March, 1880, in his 71st year. Joseph Dennie Tyler, son of Chief Justice Royall Tyler (Harvard 1776) and Mary (Palmer) Tyler, and a brother of Edward R. Tyler (Yale 1825), was born in Brattleboro, Vermont, on September 4, 1804. On graduation he entered the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia, and on the completion of his course received Deacon's orders from Bishop Moore on May 20, 1832. Before this his organs of hearing and of articulation had become impaired by disease, so that he conceived it his duty to devote himself to the instruction of deaf-mutes. Accordingly he accepted an invitation to teach in the American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb in Hartford, Connecticut, and was so occupied from the fall of 1832, until he was invited in 1839 to become the Principal of the kindred department in the Virginia Institution for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind just established in Staunton. He began his work there on October 1, 1839, and continued there, successfully and efficiently, until his death in Staunton on...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236644964
  • 9781236644961