Biographia Nautica; Or, Memoirs of Those Illustrious Seamen, to Whose Intrepidity and Conduct the English Are Indebted, for the Victories of Their Fleets, the Increase of Their Dominions, the Extension of Their Commerce, and Volume 5

Biographia Nautica; Or, Memoirs of Those Illustrious Seamen, to Whose Intrepidity and Conduct the English Are Indebted, for the Victories of Their Fleets, the Increase of Their Dominions, the Extension of Their Commerce, and Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1785 edition. Excerpt: ...the East-India Company. No more than nine seamen and three soldiers were killed, and about thirty men wounded. Ninety-one pieces of cannon.were found in the place, with a considerable quantity of ammunition and military stores. This important conquest being sinished, the British commanders resolved to attempt Hughly, a city of great trade, higher up the Ganges. The Bridgewater of twenty guns, and a stoop, with a detachment of troops under the command of captain Kirkpatrick, were destined for this service. This armament proceeded up the river on the 5th of January, and reduced the place without much difficulty. Twenty pieces of cannon were found on the ramparts, besides a considerable quantity of saltpetre and magazines of grain, which were immediately destroyed by the conquerors. The rlabob of Bengal, enraged at being thus rapidly driven from his most important possessions, assembled an army of ten thousand horse and sifteen thousand foot, and, on the 2d of February, encamped about a mile from Calcutta. Colonel Clive, though very inserior in number, resolved to attack the nabob in his camp, and requested the admiral to assist him with all the sailors he could spare. Six hundred seamen were landed, under the command of captain Warwick, on the 5th, at one in the morning; at three colonel Clive marched his little army, and about sive the at'ack began. The nabob, after a seeble resistance, retreated, with the loss of a thousand men killed, wounded and taken. This action, though not decisive, obliged the nabob to sign articles of capitulation, very advantageous to the East-India company. Having thus humbled this insolent nabob, the conquerors turned their attention towards Chandenagore, a capital French setsettlement above Calcutta, on the same river....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 232 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 422g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236659678
  • 9781236659675