Bibliotheca Classica; Or, a Classical Dictionary. Containing a Copious Account of the Principal Proper Names Mentioned in Ancient Authors with the Val

Bibliotheca Classica; Or, a Classical Dictionary. Containing a Copious Account of the Principal Proper Names Mentioned in Ancient Authors with the Val

By (author) 

List price: US$77.51

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1833 edition. Excerpt: ... truck by the resemblance. And this resemblance will becomo still more marked if wo consider that Djem (Djoemo in the Zend-Avesta) begins propeily with a species of sibilant G, which, being pronounced more roughly in somo dialects than in others, approximates very closely to the sound of Ch. Besides, all that tho Greek tell us of Achamenes corresponds very exactly with what the East relates of its Djcmschid. Achmmenes was the founder of tho royal line of Persia, nml to him Cyrus, Pariui, and Xerxes, were proud of tracing their origin. With the Persians of the present ilav, the name of DjemschiJ is held in the highest veneration as that of the founder of Persr polis, and a grent and glorious monarch.--Herodotus (7. 61.) states that tho Peisians were anciently (iroJ.ai) called by the Greeks Cepkenes (Kqtpnvei), but by themselves and their neighbours Arlaci ('Afirarui). As regards tho name Cephencs, there is an evident mistake on the part of the historian, and the appellation beyond a doubt belongs only to certain tribes of the ancient Northern Chaldtea, who actually bore this name. With respect to the term Arlai it may be remarked, that it merely designates a brave and warrior-people, being derived from the Persian art or ard, "strong," "brave." (Consult remarks at tho end of the article Artaxerxes.)--One of the earliest names of Persia, and the Persian empire, and the one most usual with the Persians themselves up to the present day, is Iran, while all tho country beyond the Oxua was denominated Turon. The former of these appellations is identical with the Eeriene of the Zend-Avesta, and will be alluded to again in thecouise of the present article.--The name Persia would seem to have como from that of the province of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 728 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 37mm | 1,279g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123657561X
  • 9781236575616