The Biblical Repository and Quarterly Observer Volume 7

The Biblical Repository and Quarterly Observer Volume 7

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...as yet perfect. C(65) The last meaning in order of lo;u'Copai is to impute, to re on to, to put to the account of. This is plainly aderioed, and not an original meaning. Hence, (as we have seen in respect to: ';_i'_t in the Old Testament), this signification of the verb is not frequent. A great part of the instances of such a usage in the New Testament, occur in one and the same paragraph (Rom. IV), where the same subject is continued; and some, which are found elsewhere, appertain to the same subject. The use, therefore, which is ranked under this fifth head, seems to be very circumscribed. Rom. 4: 3, ' Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him for righteousness;' i. e. his believing, or the faith which he exercised in the divine promises of a numerous offspring, was counted to him as righteousness. The meaning is, that, in consequence of such an act of faith, he was substantially regarded and treated as a righteous man would be. In other words, God, on account of Abraham's faith, treated him in a favourable manner, or was very gracious to him. Certain it is, from the tenor of the apostle's argument, that he does not mean to assert, in this case, that Abraham's faith caused him to be received and rewarded on the ground of merit, just as perfect law-righteousness would have done. Paul can be consistently interpreted as asserting only, that Abraham's faith was the instrumental cause of his being admitted to the divine favour, and in this respect, therefore, of being treated as if he were righteous. In other words; his faith was a conditio sine qua non, -'a merit of cononurrv, but not of condignity, ' as some have expressed it. I forbear further discussion here; as I have already...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 202 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236817397
  • 9781236817396