Beyond Unions and Collective Bargaining
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Beyond Unions and Collective Bargaining

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Description

The first book to provide a comprehensive examination of nonunion industrial relations -- its definition and parameters, and the causes and factors that led to the nonunion reality. Beyond Unions and Collective Bargaining focuses on labor relations in the private -- sector labor market, which accounted for about 90% of the sector at the end of 1999. Troy discusses with clarity and authority the transformation in the United States from the organized to the private labor market. Within a two-part format, Troy first deals with the manifold historical conditions that set the stage for the competitive nonunion alternative and then addresses the all-important question, "What makes the nonunion system work?"
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Product details

  • Paperback | 256 pages
  • 153.2 x 229.6 x 15.7mm | 358.31g
  • Taylor & Francis Inc
  • M.E. Sharpe
  • Armonk, United States
  • English
  • charts, tables, bibliography, index
  • 0765604701
  • 9780765604705

Table of contents

Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed ten justices to the U.S. Supreme Court - more than any president except Washington - and during his presidency from 1933 to 1945, the Court gained more visibility, underwent greater change, and made more landmark decisions than it had in its previous 150 years of existence. FDR challenged, confronted, and ultimately transformed the Supreme Court from a conservative, anti-interventionist institution opposed to government involvement in the economy to a liberal, activist Court that expanded government powers, protected civil liberties, and promoted civil rights. This collection of ten essays examines FDR's influence on the Supreme Court and the Court's growing influence on American life during his presidency. Subjects include the court-packing fight of 1937, the impact of the New Deal on the Court, key FDR appointments (Hugo Black, Felix Frankfurter, and William O. Douglas), and the Roosevelt Court's enduring legacy.
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