Bench and Bar; Reminiscences of One of the Last of an Ancient Race

Bench and Bar; Reminiscences of One of the Last of an Ancient Race

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1889 edition. Excerpt: ...come into Fashion among Barristers with the Volunteer Movement--Judges still Refuse to Wear Them--Beards in the Reign of Queen Elizabeth--A Ghastly Barber--Wig and Gown--Fashion in Dress--At the Queen's Drawing-Room--Anecdote--Hair Powder--Anecdote. When one reflects upon the hirsute physiognomies of so many members of the Bar at the present time, it seems remarkable that for very many years anterior to about 1860 A.d. scarcely a beard and certainly not even the downy symptom of a moustache was to be seen on the face of any practising barrister; but still more would people be surprised to learn that somewhere between thirty and forty years ago a member of the profession was actually ostracised by his companions for presuming to carry such an appendage to his features. Yet such is the fact. There was a quiet, gentlemanly, well-informed man, named Brierley, who used to attend the Central Criminal 160 BEARDS AND MOUSTACHES. Court, and who wore a long flowing beard and a thick moustache, which seem to have given offence to some of the leaders who regularly frequented the sessions. He was past middlelife, was very inoffensive, and could have excited no jealousy, for he never had any business, and never seemed to expect any. His aspirations appeared to be confined to an occasional spoonful of 'soup' from the official tureen. His delinquency consisted solely in wearing hair upon his chin and upper lip. A meeting of the senior Bar was called, to which he was summoned. None but ocular proof was, of course, required, and he was called upon for his defence. He seemed quite to recognize the enormity of his crime, for instead It U necessary, perhaps, that I should explain to the uninitiated what 'soup ' means, for it was a very important word in the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236555082
  • 9781236555083