Before an Audience, Or, the Use of the Will in Public Speaking; Talks to the Students of the University of St. Andrews and the University of Aberdeen

Before an Audience, Or, the Use of the Will in Public Speaking; Talks to the Students of the University of St. Andrews and the University of Aberdeen

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1890 edition. Excerpt: ...danger of his life from drowning, and I spun round with the same "natural tone of voice" and the same " energetic pathos of diction and countenance." I venture to say that if Garrick's instructions had been followed by his preacher, Garrick would have been the first to leave the house in disgust. He would ask: "What is the matter with the parson? Is he mad V And-J would reply: "No, those are the engaging features and graceful gestures and natural tones of voice which he used in the drawing-room while fetching the hartshorn for a friend who had fainted from a lack of ventilation, and was consequently in imminent danger of his life." To see the absurdity of this advice to the preachers-we have only to ask: Should a preacher behave in the pulpit as though he were rescuing a man from drowning, or nursing him out of a fainting fit i If ever the occasion for such behavior should arise, it would be an occasion similar to that which is perpetual on the boards of a theatre. What is occasional with the speaker is perpetual with the actor. I suspect that something of the nature of theatrical earnestness is running in the heads of these anecdotes, and the suspicion is confirmed by the next anecdote by which I will illustrate our topic. The bishop to the actor, who in this instance is Betterton: "What is the reason that whole audiences should be moved to tears, and have all sorts of passions excited, at the representation of Theat"cal Esrncstflcss some story on the stage, which they knew to be feigned, and in the event of which they were not at all concerned; yet that the same persons should sit so utterly unmoved at discourses from the pulpit, upon subjects of the utmost importance to them, relative not...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 42 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236802187
  • 9781236802187