The Beer of the Bible; One of the Hitherto Unknown Leavens of Exodus; (A Confirmation of Biblical Accuracy), with a Visit to an Arab Brewery, Notes on the Oriental Firment Products, Etc., and Map of the Routes of the Exodus, with

The Beer of the Bible; One of the Hitherto Unknown Leavens of Exodus; (A Confirmation of Biblical Accuracy), with a Visit to an Arab Brewery, Notes on the Oriental Firment Products, Etc., and Map of the Routes of the Exodus, with

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...in the edge of the wilderness. Exonus xiv. 2-4. Speak unto the children of Israel, that they turn back and encamp before Pi-hahiroth, between Migdol and the sea, over against Baal-zephon: before it shall ye encamp by the sea. For Pharaoh will say of the children of Israel, They are entangled in the land, the wilderness hath shut them in. Vide also Deuteronomy xvi., and Exodus xii., xiii., xiv. Anew light is thrown upon the comments on Exodus by the enlargement of our knowledge on two points;--1. That the new route between the Land of Goshen and the Red Sea, announced recently, admits of easy travelling. 2. That the time required for leavening bread (between half and one hour) taken in conjunction with the above, opens up the vexed question of the place of institution of the feast of unleavened bread. Before noting the co-relation which exists between these two incidents, it is necessary to know the lately described and former routes of the Exodus. The map, page 94, shows all which have been claimed. It has been compiled and corrected from numerous sources, at considerable length of time, up to the latest date. No similar one has ever been attempted. The amount of literature on the journey of the Hebrews is enormous, too much has been library work, written by people who have never been near the spot. The contention advanced by the most orthodox writers regarding the Red Sea passage is, that the ordinary tidal influences, miraculously assisted by a strong wind, enabled the Israelites to pass safely over a dry space on what is now desert sand, near the Suez Canal. The " strong east wind " recorded in the Authorised Version is notable; the Hebrew reads, "a very strong wind" the Septuagint (the Greek version) reads, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 56 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 118g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236983076
  • 9781236983077