Beautiful Gardens, How to Make and Maintain Them; Modern Artistic Flower Gardening, with Plans, Designs, and Photographic Illustrations and Coloured Plates. Selections of Beautiful Flowers Given, with Particulars of How to Grow Them

Beautiful Gardens, How to Make and Maintain Them; Modern Artistic Flower Gardening, with Plans, Designs, and Photographic Illustrations and Coloured Plates. Selections of Beautiful Flowers Given, with Particulars of How to Grow Them

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...rises, to brighten the dull days of autumn with its cheerful rays. Perhaps the cult of the Dahlia has hitherto kept the perennial Aster in the background, but why two plants so completely dissimilar should ever have come into competition is diificult to comprehend. The Dahlia is a tender florists' flower, of high rank and beauty admittedly, but out of place in the mixed border, where, with all its brilliancy, it is incongruous. The Dahlia lover should give his favourites a special bed. The Michaelmas Daisy, per contra, is a perfect border flower, of unsullied character as to hardiness. Its softly tinted blossoms show up best against a background of shrubs, and when the tender autumn light steals on, its satiny mauves and dusky violets have an inexpressibly refined yet glowing warmth of colouring. To get the full beauty from the Michaelmas Daisies they must be grown in deep, rich soil, and under frequent division. It is even well to renew them from cuttings, which give plants of great vigour. The author has had very grati fying results from striking cuttings of young L growths from the base in gritty soil in a cold frame directly they could be secured in late winter or early spring. But this is a luxury rather than a necessity. If division is practised---and it should be done at least every other year if the finest plants are to be secured--let it be performed directly growth appears, which, in the case of some varieties, especially in mild districts, may be early in February. The larger sorts should be placed in the border near early-blooming plants, which can be cut back as they fade to make room for the Asters. This is a better plan than transplanting the latter from nursery beds when they come into bud, for they are quite liable...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236974786
  • 9781236974785