Bean Culture; A Practical Treatise on the Production and Marketing of Beans, with a Special Chapter on Commercial Problems

Bean Culture; A Practical Treatise on the Production and Marketing of Beans, with a Special Chapter on Commercial Problems

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ...importance in the United States. The bean canker is a disease of French and scarlet runner beans. In 1901, many reports were received by the New York experiment station relative to a disease of the bean plant. The stems of nearly grown plants were broken over at the joints and an examination revealed the appearance of rotting at the joints. The trouble came to be known as the joint rot of the bean stem. Professor Stone tells us that the real character of the trouble and its cause were not discovered though it was supposed to be due to excessive rains. Inquiry the following season in the bean fields did not reveal its presence in spite of the fact that the season was characterized by greater abundance of rain than the preceding one. INSECT PESTS Bean weevil (Bruchus obtectus) is a formidable enemy of beans. It not only oviposits and develops in the pods in the field, but continues to breed for successive generations in harvested and stored seed, N Y Cornell Bui 210. until the seed is useless for planting or as food for man or stock. In southern sections and even as far north as Washington, D. C, it is almost impossible to obtain a crop of beans uninfested by bean weevil, and hence the stores in the southern cities are supplied mainly from the north. The bean weevil varies in size but its length will average about an eighth of an inch. The wing covers are mottled and the insect is thickly coated with fine brown, gray and olive pubescence. F. H. Chittenden says that oviposition takes place primarily in the field, eggs being deposited upon or inserted in the pod through the hole made by the jaws of the females and other openings such as are caused by drying and splitting. In shelled beans the eggs are dropped loosely in the bag or other...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236768175
  • 9781236768179