Battles and Leaders of the Civil War; Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based Upon "The Century War Series" Volume 2

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War; Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based Upon "The Century War Series" Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$22.39

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...to the support of General Jackson, and General Longstreet supporting General A. P. Hill---the four divisions keeping in communication with each other, and moving en echelem on separate roads, if practicable; the left division in advance, with skirmishers and sharp-shooters extending their front, will sweep down the Chickahominy, and endeavor to drive the enemy from his position above New Bridge, General Jackson bearing well to his left, turning Beaver Dam Creek, and taking the direction toward Cold Harbor, etc." General Jackson was unable to reach the point expected on the morning of the 26th. General A. P. Hill says: "Three o'clock P. M. having arrived, and no intelligence from Jackson or Branch, I determined to cross at once, rather than hazard the failure of the whole plan by longer deferring it." Heavy firing was heard at 3 P. M. at Meadow Bridge, and the Federal outposts were seen fieeing toward Mechanicsville, pursued by A. P. Hill. We could see a line of battle drawn up at that village ready to receive Hill. My division being nearest the bridge, Longstreet ordered me to cross first. Some delay was made in repairing the bridge, and A. P. Hill became hotly engaged before we could get to his relief. At this time President Davis and staff hurried past us, going "to the sound of the firing." Ripley's brigade was pushed forward to the support of three batteries of artillery of Major H. P. J ones's battalion, and the two under Captains R. A. Hardaway and J. W. Bondurant. The five batteries soon silenced the Federal artillery, and the whole plateau about Mechanicsville was abandoned to the Confederates, the Federals retiring across Beaver Dam Creek, which was strongly fortified. Our...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 362 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 19mm | 644g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236808576
  • 9781236808578