The Battle-Fields of the Revolution; Comprising Descriptions of the Principal Battles, Sieges, and Other Events of the War of Independence

The Battle-Fields of the Revolution; Comprising Descriptions of the Principal Battles, Sieges, and Other Events of the War of Independence : Interspersed with Characteristic Anecdotes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1854 edition. Excerpt: ...his services by a liberal grant of money and land. DEPARTURE or LA FAYETTE FROM FRANCE. 15 AFTER the battles of Trenton and Princeton, Washington passed the winter of 1776-7 in expelling the British from most of their posts in New Jersey. During the greater part of this time, his head quarters were at Morristown. The spring was passed in vain endeavors on the part of Sir William_Howe, to bring on a general en gagement, and in June he gave up the attempt and withdrew his army from New Jersey to Staten Island. His cordingly, after keeping the American General in long and perplexing suspense concerning his intended Jperations, he at length sailed from Sandy Hook with about sixteen thousand men; entered Chesapeake Bay; and on the 24th of August arrived at the head of Elk 'river. Generals Grant and Knyphausen having joined him on the 8th of September with the troops under their command, the whole army moved onward in two columns toward Philadelphia, the possession of which was now discovered to be the object of the British Commander. General Washington, who regulated his movements by those of the enemy, had by this time, with the whole American army, excepting the light infantry, which remained on the lines, taken a position behind Red Clay Creek, on the road leading directly from the enemy's camp to Philadelphia. The British boldly advanced until they were within two miles of the Americans. _ object was now to gain possession of Philadelphia. Ac General Washington, on reconnoitering their situation, apprehending their object to be to turn his right, and, suddenly crossing the Brandywine, to seize the heights on the north side of that river and cut oif his communication with Philadelphia, changed his position early in the night of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236894405
  • 9781236894403