Bartolozzi and His Works; A Biographical and Descriptive Account of the Life and Career of Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. (Illustrated) with Some Observations on the Present Demand for and Value of His Prints the Way to Detect Volume 1

Bartolozzi and His Works; A Biographical and Descriptive Account of the Life and Career of Francesco Bartolozzi, R.A. (Illustrated) with Some Observations on the Present Demand for and Value of His Prints the Way to Detect Volume 1

By (author) 

List price: US$19.98

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ... Print splitting is legitimate enough when it is used to Nicholls was the factotum of the more celebrated Edward Evans, print dealer, cleaner, restorer, and splitter, of Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn, and afterwards of 403, Strand, whose father, Edward V. Evans, had conducted a similar business (begun in 1820), before him. Edward Evans, who was in partnership with, and assisted by, his brother Albert, was perhaps more especially known as possessing an extensive knowledge of portraits, and his two bulky catalogues are even now standard works of reference. The last of the family died some ten or twelve years ago. aid the remounting of a marginless print, in the manner already described; but it is sometimes abused for the manufacture, with the object of obtaining higher prices, of spurious proofs, in a manner detailed in the chapter headed " Deceptions with Prints." There are two plans usually adopted in splitting prints. The first is to paste a piece of linen over the face and another over the back of the print, and when dry to violently tear them asunder, the two pieces of paper that will be found adhering being afterwards removed by damping. A simpler plan, but one requiring more care, is to coat both face and back of the print with ordinary flour paste, which is allowed to dry, the process being repeated several times. A corner of the print is then nicked with a penknife, and it will be found that the double coating of paste has rendered the print sufficiently strong to bear pulling completely asunder. The paste is afterwards removed with luke-warm water. 93 Landseer's Landseer's painting of the "Eagle's Nest," which had not been previously engraved, appeared not very long ago in the Illustrated London News, and Mr....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236599330
  • 9781236599339