Bank Protection, Mississippi River; Plant, Methods, and Material in Use on Works Under Direction of Mississippi River Commission

Bank Protection, Mississippi River; Plant, Methods, and Material in Use on Works Under Direction of Mississippi River Commission

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...per day, at a cost of say $0.016 to $0.02 per ton. The side molding boards were unclamped at the end of one to two hours. This allowed the division plates to press together slightly, the air to circulate freely in the space between adjacent blocks, thus shortening the period at which the steel plates could be safely removed and reset in a new line of molds. Practically, I had often to remove these steel plates at the end of two hours, owing to the limited number at hand; this is entirely too early and results in considerable breakage of the green or fresh blocks. There should be enough of these plates at hand so that they would not have to be removed sooner than six or eight hours. Such a number was not procured this season because of the fact that there was a probability that after a season's work it would be demonstrated that a modification of the plant would be not only advisable but imperative from the point of view of greater economy of operation. In 1900 and 1901 the plant was improved and concrete was made aboard barges at a cost of $1.79 per ton despite the fact that the plant was often tied up for lack of barges. The cost of those delays had to be absorbed in the cost of the concrete made. The report for 1902 made the year's work absorb most of the cost of plant. The Same System was followed when the plant was increased and improved in 1902 and 1903. The costs per ton were given as follows: 1901, total cost, $2; 1902, total cost, $1.90; 1903, total cost, $2.03. The work was discontinued in 1904 by the district engineer without any explanation as to the reasons therefor. An investigation of the cause of the loss of the mats sunk with concrete ballast revealed the fact that there was a shortage of ballast at the time...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236865286
  • 9781236865281