The Ballads and Songs of Yorkshire; Transcribed from Private Manuscripts, Rare Broadsides, and Scarce Publications with Notes and a Glossary

The Ballads and Songs of Yorkshire; Transcribed from Private Manuscripts, Rare Broadsides, and Scarce Publications with Notes and a Glossary

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ...hope appear'd, To save us from impending ruin, Which these French scoundrels were a brewing, At Doncaster a troop stepp'd forth, All men of dignity and worth, With wrath and indignation fir'd, (By Mars himself, no doubt, inspir'd, ) With minds most valorous and willing, Regardless of their pay--a shilling, Offer'd themselves to fight our battles, And to protect our goods and chattels. To four times four their number mounted, Tho' each a thousand shou'd be counted; Soon as 'twas known they were assembled, The king of France look'd pale and trembled, Recall'd his army from the strand, And drew his lighters all to land. This, soon as mighty Fred'rick knew, (For quick their fame to Prussia flew, ) That king, who all the world must own Has soldiers good as most are known, Said, " Give me sixteen such as these, I'll sack Vienna when I please." O Doncaster! blest corporation, Whose sons add glory to the nation, May Peace and Plenty still attend you, And neighbouring lords their venison send you. But hark! I hear the beat of drum, See here with linksf the heroes come. Lo, in the front three men of laws, All stedfast for the good old cause. And first see Stovin, J best of men, Equal to brandish sword or pen, '1757. "The militia raised.--Sixteen inhabitants of Doncaster entered as volunteers."--Miller's Hist. Doncaster, p. 183. + Alluding to their exercising by torchlight. X James Stovin, esq., of Whitgift, a justice of the peace for the counties of York and Lincoln, died at Sprotbrough hall, where he then resided, 26 July, 1789, and was buried at Rossington. He was son of George Stovin, of Crowle and Winterton, the Lincolnshire antiquary. On the 11 Dec. 1771, he was appointed town-clerk of Doncaster, an office which he resigned on the 12...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 78 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123651792X
  • 9781236517920