Bacteriological and Clinical Studies of the Diarrheal Diseases of Infancy with Reference to the Bacillus Dysenteriae (Shiga); From the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research

Bacteriological and Clinical Studies of the Diarrheal Diseases of Infancy with Reference to the Bacillus Dysenteriae (Shiga); From the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...diarrhea. He was under observation five weeks, with practically a normal temperature, rising occasionally to 102 F. The stools were fluid and green, two to five a day, no blood, but slight amount of mucus. B. dysenteric was isolated from the stools on the day of admission. Autopsy.--Liver large and soft. Spleen hard and small. Small intestine--Peyer's patches congested; no ulceration. Large intestine--The mucous membrane near the ileo-cecal valve is congested; throughout the rest of the colon the follicles are pigmented and slightly depressed. Microscopical.--Owing to the length of time of the autopsy after death, postmortem changes had taken place in the intestines that made them unsuitable for microscopical examination. Case XXVII.--C. C, seven months. There was a history of two days' diarrhea before admission to the hospital. The stools were green with mucus, two to six a day. No blood till two days before death, after an illness of thirtyfour days. Temperature 98 F. to 101 F, until just before death, then a rapid rise to 104 F., followed by a fall. The Shiga bacillus was not found twentyeight days before death; an examination for it was positive eighteen days before death. Autopsy.--Liver fatty. Spleen firm and dark. Stomach normal. The small intestine appears normal except the last two inches of the ileum, which are greatly congested. One small spot the size of a pea is thickened, exfoliating and covered with a necrotic mass. The large intestine is very much thickened throughout its whole extent, apparently due to a swelling of the submucosa. There is congestion throughout In places extending for two to three inches there are hemorrhages into the mucosa. In no place does the mucous membrane appear smooth. No ulceration is made out, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236942027
  • 9781236942029