The A B C of Collecting Old English China; Giving a Short History of the English Factories, and Showing How to Apply Tests for Unmarked China Before 1800

The A B C of Collecting Old English China; Giving a Short History of the English Factories, and Showing How to Apply Tests for Unmarked China Before 1800

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ... Gazette advertised: "This is to give notice to all potters in the blue-andwhite potting way, and enamellers on china ware, that by applying at the counting-house at the china works near Bow they may meet with employment and proper encouragement according to their merit; likewise painters brought up in the snuffbox way, japanning, fan-painting, &c., may have an opportunity of trial, wherein if they succeed they shall have due encouragement. N.B.--At the same house a person is wanted who can model small figures in clay neatly." In the same year the Bow China Warehouse was opened, near the Royal Exchange, China'warehouse n Cornhill, London, with a back door facing the Bank. In 1762, Weatherby, one of the partners, died, and next year John Crowther, of Cornhill, chinaman, became bankrupt, and all of the stock was sold by auction, curious figures, girandoles, branches for chimney-pieces, finely decorated with figures and flowers, knife and fork handles (see illustration), dishes, compotiers, dessert services, with the fine old partridge and wheatsheaf patterns, &c. Crowther, however, continued the Bow Works, and after a time opened another warehouse in St. Paul's Churchyard; but Bow had failed, as Chelsea did, to satisfy public taste, which was turned towards Derby, and in 1775 the entire stock, including moulds, tools, and machinery, was sold to William Duesbury, who removed them, next year, to Derby. Betew, a dealer in curiosities, in Old Compton Street, speaking to Nollekens, the sculptor, circa 1780, says: "There were some clever men who modelled for the Bow concern, and they produced several spirited figures: Quin in Falstaff; Garrick in Richard; Frederick, Duke of Cumberland, striding triumphantly over the Pretender, who...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236543122
  • 9781236543127