An Autoethnography on the Reasons for Mixing Identities

An Autoethnography on the Reasons for Mixing Identities

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Description

The An Autoethnography on the Reasons for Mixing Identities information and process assists you or human services providers to understand how social classifications can intersect and cause changing behaviors. Whether you or your clients are struggling through social interactions, demanding expectations, and difficult times through life with ease, the findings provided in the An Autoethnography on the Reasons for Mixing Identities helps with a clear and simple way to perceive and understand what might be happening around you, or around the people you serve, that might influence behaviors.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 270 pages
  • 215.9 x 279.4 x 15.49mm | 780.17g
  • Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1514727447
  • 9781514727447

About Cecilia Leal-Covey Edd/CI

Let me share with you that I using a wheelchair for my self-sufficiency has not been easy. From a young age, I learned to overcome very powerful adversity in my life. At age of two, I was diagnosed with poliomyelitis (polio) in Mexico City. The polio paralyzed my body from the neck down. After 4 years of surgeries, physical therapy, and training, half of my body reestablished, but my legs did not respond, leaving me dependent on braces, crutches, and finally in a wheelchair. Despite of my physical limitations, I did not allow my disability to affect my life, especially my education and career goals. While searching diligently for education and opportunities, I was a member of a wheelchair team from Mexico City winning several gold, silver, and bronze medals representing (DF - Distrito Federal). I was also a member of the Mexican National Team. I represented Mexico in the Para-Olympics on wheelchairs in Canada and in Puerto Rico. In 1989, at age of 25, I immigrated to the U.S. and over the last 25 years, I had the satisfaction of working, as an employee and or as volunteer, with many social services organizations. During my training and work, I spent my free time outreaching to various communities through local TV news, newspapers, and workshops aimed at helping disadvantaged people become aware of their options. My involvement with the local community made a positive impact in my life; I became an advocate and an activist for the Latino community, people with disabilities, and women from all occupations. In June 20, 2015, I graduated with a Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership with a Specialization in Curriculum and Instruction (EdD/CI). Today, based on my personal experiences as a person with multiple cultures and compared to the academic literature, I speak, discuss, write, provide training or education to help my audience to perceive and understand the challenges some people with multiple social classifications might experience. My speech, discussion, or training includes information about the motives of contingency created by cognitive ambiguity across the powers of cultural difference. I explain and illustrate how intersectionality might develop the feelings ...there is always something, fish-out-of-water, the solo, the unique, and how the intersection might encourage mixing identities.show more