The Autobiography of John Brown the Cordwainer, with His Sayings and Doings in Town and Country; Shewing What Part He Took in the Spread of Church Principles Among the Working Classes

The Autobiography of John Brown the Cordwainer, with His Sayings and Doings in Town and Country; Shewing What Part He Took in the Spread of Church Principles Among the Working Classes

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ...and shove 'em when they are dead into a deal box that isn't fit to put a dog in, with neither name nor belongings so much as painted on the lid. I've not forgotten my poor old mother, and how they refused her a bit o' tea I was bringing her, because it's against their fine regulations. Curse their regulations, I say. You'd better be a felon than a pauper; they feed you better and clothe you better, and make a deal more o' you in a prison than they do in th' workhouse. If th' Bible be true, whichl begin to doubt, you rich men are in for it. You'll not grind us down under your feet for ever, I can tell you. There's a God above Who sees it all." I saw that poor Stephen was on the wrong tack, Mr. Stubbs hadn't so long before been appointed a Guardian of the Poor, and a hard one he was too. Poor Stephen, he'd striven hard to keep his old mother, but during the strike she'd been obliged to go to the workhouse, so that he was a bit bitter in his feelings and rough in his speech. Mr. Stubbs turned away offended at his freedom. "I say this," said he, turning to Mr. Tomkins, "that Mr. Jones is not acting justly to others. He may be able to pay for his fancies, but other people cannot: and so those who haven't the means will be placed in a false position." Stephen Harker hadn't time to say anything more to Mr. Stubbs, so he said to me, "I see where the shoe pinches. Precious little he'll do, and he's as rich as Jones any day. But what I'm afraid of is favouritism. I say that Jones and Pilkington should take folk into yonder spot whatever they profess." MyseZfI--And I say that they should give rooms to whoever they please....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 123693556X
  • 9781236935564