The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity

The Author's Voice in Classical and Late Antiquity

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Description

What significance does the voice or projected persona in which a text is written have for our understanding of the meaning of that text? This volume explores the persona of the author in antiquity, from Homer to late antiquity, taking into account both Latin and Greek authors from a range of disciplines. The thirteen chapters are divided into two main sections, the first of which focuses on the diverse forms of writing adopted by various ancient authors, and the
different ways these forms were used to present and project an authorial voice. The second part of the volume considers questions regarding authority and ascription in relation to the authorial voice. In particular, it looks at how later readers - and later authors - may understand the authority of a
text's author or supposed author. The volume contains chapters on pseudo-epigraphy and fictional letters, as well as the use of texts as authoritative in philosophical schools, and the ancient ascription of authorship to works of art.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 440 pages
  • 145 x 223 x 32mm | 682g
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 11 in-text illustrations
  • 0199670560
  • 9780199670567

Table of contents

FOREWORD; LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS; LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS; INTRODUCTION; PART 1: THE AUTHOR'S VOICE: PRESENTATION AND FUNCTION; SECTION 1.1 THE AUTHOR'S VOICE IN THE THIRD PERSON; SECTION 1.2: THE AUTHOR'S VOICE IN DIALOGUE; SECTION 1.3: THE AUTHOR'S VOICE IN THE FIRST PERSON; PART 2: THE AUTHOR'S VOICE: AUTHORITY AND ASCRIPTION; INDEX
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Review quote

The variety of authors and literary genres treated by the contributors, the learned and clear discussion in each chapter, and the fascinating theme of the book make this volume worth reading. * Isabella Canetta, Bryn Mawr Classical Review * The collection addresses a set of questions that are fundamental to the study of ancient literary production and reception. Given the enormous variety of ways in which issues of authorship and authorial authority have been treated by different scholarly communities under the wide umbrella of Classics - from the Homeric Question, to the debate over the lyric, to speaking inscriptions - the volume makes an important contribution in bringing together scholars working
on very different genres, periods and traditions. * Lauren Curtis, The Classical Review *
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About Anna Marmodoro

Anna Marmodoro is a Fellow in Philosophy at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford. She has a background in ancient and medieval philosophy, and a strong research interest in metaphysics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of religion. She has published journal articles in all these areas, and edited two collections of essays: The Metaphysics of Powers (2010) and The Metaphysics of the Incarnation (OUP, 2011). She also directs a
large-scale research project based in Oxford, which investigates the nature of the fundamental building blocks of reality in ancient and contemporary thought.

Jonathan Hill is Templeton World Charity Foundation Research Officer, based in the Department of Materials, University of Oxford. He was previously Research Assistant in the Philosophy Faculty, working with Anna Marmodoro on a Leverhulme-funded project on the philosophy of religion. He is author of The Lion Handbook: the History of Christianity (2007) and Dictionary of Theologians: to 1308 (2010), and co-edited with Anna Marmodoro The Metaphysics of the Incarnation
(OUP, 2011).
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