The Authority of the Church as Set Forth in the Book of Common Prayer Articles and Canons; Sermons Preached in Trinity Chapel, New York, During Lent, 1891

The Authority of the Church as Set Forth in the Book of Common Prayer Articles and Canons; Sermons Preached in Trinity Chapel, New York, During Lent, 1891

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ... weight. The name of Lightfoot, the great Bishop of Durham, may be cited as that of the man who, by his learning, has practically decided this controversy. It is said of him, by a writer in the secular press: "Bishop Lightfoot was by general confession the master of patristic learning. He made the field of the Christian fathers his own, and had realized the times in which they wrote, so that he lived in their atmosphere and had caught their spirit. The position which he held, as one of the foremost, if not the first, patristic scholar in Europe, was such that no questions connected with Christian apologetics could be raised while he was living that he was not likely to be able to answer." Now, what did that great scholar to help the Church in her assertion that the episcopacy is of apostolic origin? Let us hear what he has left on record, in summing up the case: "Unless we have recourse to a sweeping condemnation of received documents it seems vain to deny that, early in the second century, the episcopal office was firmly and widely established. "The evidence for the early and wide extension of episcopacy throughout proconsular Asia, the scene of St. John's latest labors, may be considered irrefragable. "Its maturer forms are seen first in those regions where the latest surviving apostles fixed their abode, and at a time when its prevalence cannot be dissociated from their influence or their sanction. "The institution of an episcopate must be placed as far back as the closing years of the first century, and cannot, without violence to historical testimony, be dissociated from the name of St. John." And, finally, the Bishop of Durham says, referring to an investigation of his own into the origin of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236949870
  • 9781236949875