An Authentic History of the Late War Between the United States and Great Britain; To Which Will Be Added, the War with Algiers and the Treaty of Peace, the Treaties of Peace with the Various Tribes of North American Indians and the United

An Authentic History of the Late War Between the United States and Great Britain; To Which Will Be Added, the War with Algiers and the Treaty of Peace, the Treaties of Peace with the Various Tribes of North American Indians and the United

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...in line through the woods, he resolved to advance within reach of the foe before he formed. Although this was taking upon himself a high responsibility, yet the order was so absurd that he dared to disobey; and the success attending his after movements, seem clearly to justify the measure. Though a scrupulous obedience to the orders of superiors in an army is generally a sacred duty, and a sure pledge of victory, yet the incompetency or mistake of a commander, may sometimes allow and require a partial defection from them. It Would have been admissible, -and even meritorious for the officers of General Hull at the capture and surrender of Detroit; and seems tolerable, a'nd even laudable for General Ripley on this occasion. In performing the proposed movement of General Ripley, we suffered great annoyance and sustained considerable loss from the constant and destructive fire of the enemy's battery, which was chiefly directed at General Scott's mutilated and almost exhausted corps, which we were about passing to form in line upon their left. The enemy's artillery was placed upon an eminence, and from its destructive effect upon our advancing columns, the General was sensible unless they were taken, we should be compelled to retire, or be overpowered. He accordingly asked Colonel Miller if he could storm and take them. The intrepid though modest hero, replied, " I can try;" an answer truly worthy aLeonidas and a Milliades, and shows the striking difference between real magnanimity and empty daring. At this time Gen. Scott's corps was about a quarter of a mile in the rear, having ceased firing; the volunteer corps under the command of General Porter, was not yet marshalled in the field; and our artillerists and dragoons were not then nor...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236574958
  • 9781236574954