Attention and Performance XV

Attention and Performance XV : Conscious and Nonconscious Information Processing

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During the past decade, evidence of dissociation between conscious and nonconscious information processing has emerged from the study of normal subjects and brain damaged patients. The thirty-five original contributions in this book cover the latest work on this important topic.During the past decade, evidence of dissociation between conscious and nonconscious information processing has emerged from the study of normal subjects and brain damaged patients. The thirty-five original contributions in this book cover the latest work on this important topic across such traditional areas of research as vision, face recognition, spatial attention, control processes, semantic memory, episodic memory, and learning. Each section is introduced by an overview chapter that presents and evaluates the available empirical evidence in a given area and is followed by several experimental papers. The book opens with the Association Lecture, by George Mandler, "On Remembering without Really Trying: Hypermnesia, Incubation, and Mind Popping."show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 965 pages
  • 180.34 x 256.54 x 58.42mm | 2,109.19g
  • MIT Press Ltd
  • Bradford Books
  • Massachusetts, United States
  • English
  • Reprint
  • 0262210126
  • 9780262210126

Back cover copy

During the past decade, evidence of dissociation between conscious and nonconscious information processing has emerged from the study of normal subjects and brain-damaged patients. The thirty-five original contributions in this book cover the latest work on this important topic across such traditional areas of research as vision, face recognition, spatial attention, control processes, semantic memory, episodic memory, and learning. Each section includes several experimental papers that present and evaluate the available empirical evidence in a given area. The book opens with the association lecture by George Mandler, "Hypermnesia, Incubation, and Mind Popping: On Remembering without Really Trying".show more

Table of contents

Part 1 Association lecture: hypermnesia, incubation, and mind popping - on remembering without really trying, George Mandler. Part 2 Visual processes: visual perception and visual awareness after brain damage - a tutorial overview, Martha J. Farah; the organization of sensory motor representations in the neocortex - a hypothesis based on temporal coding, Wolf Singer; the role of parallel pathways in visible persistence, C.A. Marzi et al; motor responses to nonreportable, masked stimuli - where is the limit of direct parameter specification?, Odmar Neumann and Werner Klotz. Part 3 Face recognition: conscious and nonconscious recognition of familiar faces, Andrew W. Young; repetition priming of face recognition, Vicki Bruce et al; structural and functional organization of knowledge about faces and proper names - a positron emission tomography study, Justine Sergent et al. Part 4 Spatial attention: space and selective attention, Giacomo Rizzolatti et al; multiple sources of spatial information for aimed limb movements, Richard A. Abrams et al; visual attention and the control of eye movements in early infancy, Mark H. Johnson; spatial synergies between auditory and visual attention, Jon Driver and Charles J. Spence; does oculomotor readiness mediate cognitive control of visual attention? revisited!, Raymond M. Klein and Amanda Pontefract; object-based attentional mechanisms - evidence from patients with unilateral neglect, Marlene Behrmann and Steven P. Tipper; awareness of contralesional information in unilateral neglect - effects of verbal cueing, tracing and vestibular stimulation, Giuseppe Vallar et al. Part 5 Control processes: multiple levels of control processes, Tim Shallice; shifting intentional set - exploring the dynamic control of tasks, Alan Allport et al; progress in the use of interactive models for understanding attention and performance, Jonathan D. Cohen and Therese A. Huston; interhemispheric control in the normal brain - evidence from redundant bilateral presentations, Eran Zaidel and Janice Rayman. Part 6 Semantic memory: of cabbages and things - semantic memory from a neuropsychological perspective - a tutorial review, Eleanor M. Saffran and Myrna F. Schwartz; category specificity and informational specificity in neuropsychological impairment of semantic memory, Giuseppe Sartori et al; semantic processing of ignored stimuli - the role of attention in memory, Shlomo Bentin; the effect of orthographic-semantic systematicity on the acquisition of new words, Jay G. Rueckl and Itiel E. Dror; semantic effects on syntactic ambiguity resolution - evidence for a constraint-based resolution process, Patrizia Tabossi et al. Part 7 Explicit and implicit memory: memory without conscious recollection - a tutorial review from a neuropsychological perspective, Morris Moscovitch et al; measuring recollection - strategic versus automatic influences of associative context, Larry L. Jacoby; explicit and implicit memory. (Part contents).show more