An Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of Architecture in England, from the Conquest to the Reformation; With Notices of Above 3000 British Edifices

An Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of Architecture in England, from the Conquest to the Reformation; With Notices of Above 3000 British Edifices

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1825 edition. Excerpt: ... tower is a rich and beautiful porch. The nave of the Cathedral is peculiarly fine; the shafts of the piers have a divisional band, like the Early English shafts; the eastern portion of the nave next the great tower, presents an appearance remarkably magnificent, from the numerous steps, and the arches with pierced parapets leading to various parts. There are many fine tombs of the archbishops, which should be noticed; these, with some few other monuments in the Cathedral, form nearly a regular series from very early date till the reformation. In this Cathedral there is not much of Decorated character; for though there are small portions of that style, the general features of the building are Norman, Early English, and Perpendicular; and in these styles the church forms a most excellent study, from the variety and singularity of many portions. The richness and variety of the stone screen-work in the various chapels deserves particular attention, and the organ-screen, at the entrance to the choir, is peculiarly fine. Among the prebendal houses and other buildings surrounding the Cathedral are mixed various portions of the ancient buildings of the monastery, and with the walls and gates of the precinct, are extended over a large space of ground. Of these, it may suffice to enumerate the building called the Treasury, a very fine specimen of Norman; the Registry, which has a most excellent example of a Norman staircase; and the remains of what appears to have been the InfirMary ChAPEi, now inclosed amidst the buildings of various houses. The entrance gate, called Cheist-chuhch gate, is a good specimen of late Perpendicular. The situation of this Cathedral is so confined by buildings, that it is difficult to oltaiii any general view of it; the best...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 154 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123656362X
  • 9781236563620