An Attempt to Develop the Law of Storms by Means of Facts; Arranged According to Place and Time and Hence to Point Out a Cause for the Variable Winds, with the View to Practical Use in Navigation. Illustrated by Charts and Wood Cuts

An Attempt to Develop the Law of Storms by Means of Facts; Arranged According to Place and Time and Hence to Point Out a Cause for the Variable Winds, with the View to Practical Use in Navigation. Illustrated by Charts and Wood Cuts

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...sun is almost vertical. Near the island of Mauritius they are felt in January, February, and March, which may be deemed their summer months; and in the West Indies, according to Mr. Edward's 'History of Jamaica, ' the hurricane season begins in August and ends in October." In Colonel Capper's work, we find Franklin's explanation of what first led him to observe that the northeast storms of America came from the south-west. It is in a letter to Mr. Alexander Small, dated the 12th of May, 1760, and is as follows: --"About twenty years ago, we were to have an Franklin, eclipse of the moon at Philadelphia, about 9 o'clock; I intended to have observed it, but was prevented by a north-east storm, which came on about 7, with thick clouds as usual, that quite obscured the whole hemisphere; yet when the post brought us the Boston newspaper, giving us an account of the same storm in those parts, I found the beginning of the eclipse had been well observed there, though Boston is north-east of Philadelphia about 400 miles. This puzzled me, because the storm began so soon with us as to prevent any observation; and, being a north-east storm, I imagined it must have begun rather sooner in places further to the north-eastward, than it did at Philadelphia; but I found that it did not begin with them until 284 Chap, near 11 o'clock, so that they had a good observation 1_ of the eclipse. And, upon comparing all the other accounts I received from the other colonies, of the time of the beginning of the same storm, and since that of other storms of the same kind, I found the beginning to be always later the further north-eastward." Whilst introducing the above paragraph, Colonel Capper says, it affords us a proof that a current of air in America moved...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 106 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 204g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236581172
  • 9781236581174