The Atlantic Monthly Volume 109

The Atlantic Monthly Volume 109

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...technical matters. Is there not the danger here that in legislation, both constitutional and ordinary, Oregon is running away from the lines of reform which are being worked out through the Short Ballot? It is coming to be conceded that the ballot with a long list of ofiicials to be voted for is tantamount to admitting that inefiiciency and corruption are being not only tolerated, but encouraged. If the average voter votes more intelligently when he is able to concentrate on the choice of two or three men, instead of upon a list of from a dozen to forty, why is it not reasonable to conclude that he will use his intelligence to better purpose when he helps decide a few rather than many legislative propositions? Again, granting that the direct interposition of the electorate appears to be one of the instruments whereby our political problems may take a step toward solution, acting always on broad lines and on clearly defined principles, we still have legislatures with us----necessary evils, perhaps, as they are so often called, but nevertheless absolutely necessary. What then is the proper relation between the electorate acting in a legislative capacity, and the representative legislature? In Oregon one hears the charge that, since direct legislation has been introduced, the character of the legislature has deteriorated; that there has come a feeling of irresponsibility, a determination to let the electorate bear the onus of bad or inefiicient legis lation. There are times when some legislators seem to take the attitude that, if voters do not like the measures enacted, they have the privilege of referring them to a general election and thus assuming the burden from which the legislators themselves have freed their souls. If this comes...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 25mm | 880g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236821009
  • 9781236821003