Athens; Its Rise and Fall with Views of the Literature, Philosophy and Social Life of the Athenian People in Two Volumes Volume 2

Athens; Its Rise and Fall with Views of the Literature, Philosophy and Social Life of the Athenian People in Two Volumes Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...to raise upon the very fact that he doubts, reproaches against the horrors of democratical despotism. A strange practice for an historian to allow the premises to be false, and then to argue upon them as true! X. As we have now for ever lost sight of Themistocles on the stage of Athenian politics, the present is the most fitting opportunity to conclude the history ofhis wild and adventurous career. Persecuted by the Spartans, abandoned by his countrymen, excluded from the whole of Greece, no refuge remained to the man who had crushed the power ofPersia, save the Persian court. The generous and high-spirited policy that characterised the Oriental Despotism towards its foes, proffered him not only a safe, but a magnificent asylum. The Persian monarchs were ever ready to welcome the exiles of Greece, and to conciliate those whom they had failed to conquer. It was the fate of Themistocles to be saved by the enemies ofhis country. He had no alternative. The very accusation of connivance with the Medes drove him into their arms. Under guidance of a Persian, Themistocles traversed the Asiatic continent; and ere he reached Susa, con/trived to have a letter, that might prepare the way for him, delivered at the Persian court. His letter ran somewhat thus, if we may suppose that Thueydides preserved the import, though he undoubtedly fashioned the style. "I, Themistocles, who of all the Greeks have inflicted the severest wounds upon your race, so long as I was called by fate to resist the invasion ofthe Persians, now come to you." (He then urged, on the other hand, the services he had rendered to Xerxes in his messages after Salamis, relative to the breaking of the bridges, assuming a credit to which he was by no means entitled--and insisted that...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 124 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 236g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236585348
  • 9781236585349