Asiatick Researches, Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature of Asia Volume 9

Asiatick Researches, Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature of Asia Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1809 edition. Excerpt: ...and fulsome legends, current through the whole tribe; and which I shall pass over. There are also, in the Peninsula, Saca-vansas or 'SacaJlqja-vansas, which signify, and are understood in that country, to signify, the offspring of Saga, or king 'saca or Sa'uva'hana; and in the east, and also in the west, the followers of a deity, or some legislator and in stitutor, are often called his offspring. It is but lately that I have been acquainted with this singular tribe of Raja-Cumciras, who do not differ from other Hindus of the same class, and have now lost every vestige of their ancient religion, except the name of their institutor. Asiatic Researches, Vol. 8. p. 507. APPENDIX TO ESSAY IV, i I. PTOLEMY places Ujjayini about 255 geographical miles from the mouth of the river Mah'i, but the real distance is not above 200. The different places, mentioned by that author, between Ujjayini and the sea, stand thus. From the mouth of the Mahi, to its supposed communication with the Narmada, 60 G. M. to Tidgura 50: to Minnagara 50: to Zerogere, now Dhar or Asara-gur, 55: aud to Ujjayini 40. The two last towns are erroneously placed by him, on the banks of the Narmada, and I strongly suspect, that it is also the case with the two others. They are also placed on the left or southern bank of that river, which is not the case, unless perhaps with regard to Tidgura, which might have been situated to the south, either of the Narmadd, or some other river mistaken for the Narmada. Tidgar is certainly a true Hindi denomination, and there are several places thus called, in the more southern parts of India; yet in this instance, I suspect that it is a mistake, for Paya-gurra, or Pawa-gur, to tlie south of the river Dhda"hara, mistaken by Ptolemy for the Narmada;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 128 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 240g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236629493
  • 9781236629494