Asiatick Researches; Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature, of Asia Volume 7

Asiatick Researches; Or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal, for Inquiring Into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences, and Literature, of Asia Volume 7

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1803 edition. Excerpt: ...if tbe ceremony were not completed until night; or in case of exigency, whenever the priest approves, the nearest relation of the deceased takes up water in a new earthen jar, and returns to the town preceded by a person bearing a staff, and attended by the rest walking in procession, and led by the youngest. Going to the door of his own house, or to a place, of worship, or to some spot near water, he prepares the ground for the oblation of a funeral cake, by raising a small altar of earth, and marking lines on it as is practised for other oblations. Then taking a brush of cusd grass in his right hand, he washes therewith the ground, over which cusd grass is spread, saying, "such a one (naming the deceased, and the family from which he sprung)! may this oblation be acceptable to thee." Next, making a ball of three handfulls of boiled rice mixed with tilaft fruits of various sorts, honey, milk, butter, and similar things, such as sugar, roots, potherbs, &c. (or if that be impracticable with tila at least) he presents it on the spot he had purified, naming the deceased, and saying, "may this first funeral cake, which shall restore thy head, be acceptable to thee." Again purifying the spot in the same manner as before, and with the same words addressed to the deceased, he silently puts fragrant flowers, resin, a lighted lamp, betel leaves, and similar things, on the funeral cake, and then presents a woollen yarn, naming the deceased, and saying, "may this apparel, made of woollen yarn, be acceptable to thee." He next offers an earthen vessel full of tila and water near the funeral cake, and says, "may this vessel of tila and water be acceptable to thee." It is customary to set apart, on a leaf, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 152 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 8mm | 286g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236884450
  • 9781236884459