The Arthurian Epic; A Comparative Study of the Cambrian, Breton, and Anglo-Norman Versions of the Story and Tennyson's Idylls of the King

The Arthurian Epic; A Comparative Study of the Cambrian, Breton, and Anglo-Norman Versions of the Story and Tennyson's Idylls of the King

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1895 edition. Excerpt: ... the nineteenth century trouvere. But to return. After the achievement of the adventure of the Sangraal, a tournament is proclaimed at Camelot. Arthur and his knights proceed thither, leaving Lancelot behind with the Queen; but by her advice he resolves to be present at the jousts and determines, in his own mind, to appear as an unknown knight. After a long ride he arrives at the castle of Astolat where the King and his court are staying, but he manages to conceal himself so well, that not one of the Round Table knights recognises him. Sir Bernard, the lord of Astolat, receives his stranger guest with every mark of distinction. "This old baron had a daughter that time, that was called the faire maide of Astolat; and ever shee beheld sir Launcelot wonderfully; and she cast such a love unto sir Launcelot that shee could not withdraw her love, wherefore she died; and her name was Elaine la Blaunch. So... shee besought sir Launcelot to weare upon him at the justs a token of hers. 'Faire damosell, ' said sir Launcelot, 'and if I graunt you that, yee may say I doe more for your love than ever I did for lady or damosell.' Then hee remembred him, that hee would ride unto the justs disguised, and for because he had never before that time borne no manner of token of no damosell, then he bethought him that he would beare on of hers, that none of his blood thereby might know him. And then hee said 'Faire damosell, I will graunt you to weare a token of yours upon my helmet and therefore what it is shew me.' 'Sir, ' said shee, ' it is a red sleeve of mine, of scarlet, well embroadered with greatfearles? And so shee brought it him. So sir Launcelot received it and said: 'Never or this time did I so much for no damosell.' And then sir Launcelot betooke...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 186g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123656961X
  • 9781236569615