Art Principles in House, Furniture, and Village Building; An Exposition of Designing Principles Which Every House Builder, Furniture User, and Village Dweller Should Know

Art Principles in House, Furniture, and Village Building; An Exposition of Designing Principles Which Every House Builder, Furniture User, and Village Dweller Should Know

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1921 edition. Excerpt: ...type is forced into use by narrowness of lot, and hence is much the more common in cities, where a narrow hallway and a living room occupy the full width of the building site. This width is often 25 feet. With a slightly wider lot, say 33 or 50 feet, a narrow driveway may be left on the lot from front to rear along one or both sides. But this type of plan is used sometimes on ample lots because its arrangement of rooms is the one which best suits some families and social conditions. It is the type of plan which easily places the living room and dining room together, and yet allows an inconspicuous entrance from front hall to either, thus retaining the independence of each room and yet perfect connection between them. The central entrance usually, but not always, separates these two main rooms. When the dining room is used partially as a living room or as a study, or in general as an overflow from the living room for parties or for family use, or when it is desired to heat both rooms from a common source, the corner entrance will be preferred. It favors compactness in other respects, as plans 109 and 111 show. Tn these either the front door or the single stairway is easily reached from the kitchen, or, to state it in a more fundamental way, the front door is equally accessible from and commanding of the living room, the working room, and upstairs. This is desirable in a house with no servant, or, with a servant, in a house planned to save steps. The central entrance type is more formal in its nature and favors the isolation of dining room and living room; reasons for such separation occur where the table appointments in preparing and clearing away meals are attended by a servant, or where the living room is kept quite formally as a guest...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236792270
  • 9781236792273