The Art of Attack; Being a Study in the Development of Weapons and Appliances of Offence, from the Earliest Times to the Age of Gunpowder

The Art of Attack; Being a Study in the Development of Weapons and Appliances of Offence, from the Earliest Times to the Age of Gunpowder

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...over a shield or for slicing off a head. It would probably fly better if thrown as a missile, than a straight sword, but it was useless for guarding with, and as bad as it could be for a fair blow. A falcate weapon of this sort with a sharp point, might be used to pick at a helmeted head, or one covered with some protection like the heavy coiffure of some savages, but this implies a sort of duello, which we have no reason to suppose the users of these types particularly affected. Surely no race in their senses would adopt for the national weapon a type simply intended for picking holes in the top of an enemies skull. It is far easier to imagine that the type represents some appliance in common use adapted for the purposes of a hand weapon It might thus be a sickle, which was in use among a race of grain growers, forced by events to turn warriors; or it might be a throwing boomerang copied into iron and then hafted. This sickle-like shape reminds us indeed of the Hittite "lituus" mentioned under "Capture." But we do not know what this was. There was, however, some likeness between this and the sickle shaped symbol or weapon figured in the hand of the Royal statue found by Layard at Nimrud (1), which, whatever its purpose, we find repeated on bas-reliefs, sometimes ornamented and sometimes plain. Demmin indeed figures it socketed as though it was a sort of shaped scythe (Fig. 214), and gives I.--Nineveh and Babylon, p. 361. as a parallel a similar instrument found at Pcestum (Poseidonia) in S. Italy. Since, however, the object in the kings hand seems symbolic, the Italian instrument may be quite different. Concave edged weapons may perhaps be put into two classes, those with a boldly curved blade peculiarly sickle-like, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 114 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 218g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123650402X
  • 9781236504029