Arguments Before the Committee on Patents of the House of Representatives on H.R. 3681 and 3682; To Amend Certain Sections of the Revised Statutes Relating to Patents, January 26, February 2, and March 2, 1910, Also Copy of Letter

Arguments Before the Committee on Patents of the House of Representatives on H.R. 3681 and 3682; To Amend Certain Sections of the Revised Statutes Relating to Patents, January 26, February 2, and March 2, 1910, Also Copy of Letter

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ... such were not the law their time and money would surely be wasted. As it is they go ahead and raise money enough to patent their thought, and having patented it, they own it for seventeen years. If it is a small invention, they hope (and their ho e may be realized) that somebody will come along and say: "We give you $500 or $1,000 for your patent." If it is a big invention, they have the chance of large returns and sometimes get them; they may be disappointed, but the public and the useful arts benefit by their efforts. The patent may be a bad investment to them or their assignees, because the majority of the atents are of little or no value. I am inclined to think if you could) get the facts you would find that patents, like mines, have cost a good deal more than has been realized from them. It is the public that is most interested in the patent system, and the public wants the workman and every one else to have the stimulus that our patent system gives. It is for its interest that every thought should be patented, and if the workman can be assured, as he is under our law, that if he watches, takes his time, and does not have to take the first offer that comes along because of a provision that if he does nothing in four years or seven years or ten years he will lose his right, he is full of confidence that sooner or later during the term of his patent somebody will come along and pay him for that patent what it is worth. There is that class of inventor, the workman class, and it is a large class. There is still another class, the fprofessional inventor. I have run up against a very large number o men with a mechanical education and an inventive turn of mind who simply devote themselves to invention; who hunt around to see...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236869532
  • 9781236869531