Argentine-Chilian Boundary; Report Presented to the Tribunal Appointed by Her Britannic Majesty's Government to Consider and Report Upon the Differen

Argentine-Chilian Boundary; Report Presented to the Tribunal Appointed by Her Britannic Majesty's Government to Consider and Report Upon the Differen

By (author) 

List price: US$19.86

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...of the Pacific; it being understood that by the provisions of said Treaty, the sovereignty of each State over the respective coast line is absolute, in such a manner that Chile cannot lay claim to any point toward the Atlantic, just as the Argentine Republic can lay no claim to any toward the Pacific." The Protocol, in consequence, reaflirmed the traditional eastern boundary of Chile, the summit of the Andes, as stated by Diego de Almagro in 1535, and established that each of the nations retains, or continues to possess, the territories on the east or west of the Andes, divided by its main chain, the central chain, the snowy ridge, the barrier, the wall, always visible and practically impassable over its great extent. The Protocol, besides, clearly enacted, in unmistakable terms, that each country is entitled to all lands and waters, to wit, lakes, lagoons, rivers and parts of rivers, streams, slopes, etc., situated on the respective side of the main chain of the Andes, the line along its summit thus crossing over the water-gaps as it crosses over the wind-gaps, these being the two descriptions of mountain gaps or passes according to the true geographical meaning. The Chilian Government understood the Protocol in this sense when negotiating it (see pages 294 and following), and when approving the proceedings of the Delegates to the Conference at Buenos Aires in 1899 (see page 421). In Article VI. the demarcation is ordered to be made in the mountains, and the location of the landmarks giving visible existence to the boundary line is to be effected in each pass or accessible point of such mountains, so that no confusion can arise as to the letter and spirit of that Article; moreover, at that moment it was perfectly well known to both...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236934628
  • 9781236934628