The Archives of Maryland as Illustrating the Spirit of the Times of the Early Colonists; A Paper Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, January 25, 1886 Volume 22-27

The Archives of Maryland as Illustrating the Spirit of the Times of the Early Colonists; A Paper Read Before the Maryland Historical Society, January 25, 1886 Volume 22-27

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...letter of the series tells its own-story and is pretty. conclusive evidence that at this period of his career Martin had lost the power of self-control in the use of stimulants. Reproaching the lady for coldness, he says: "I have been told since you left town that on last Sunday week, in the evening, I was seen at your lodgings. Of this I had no possible recollection. I doubt not that I made a very foolish figure, but I think it impossible that I should have behaved with rudeness or impropriety. Was that the reason, my very dear Mrs. H, of the coldness and reserve you appeared to meet me with on the Monday morning when I called on you before I went to Annapolis? If so, I will not blame you, but be assured you shall never see me again in a, situation that I know not what I do, unless it should proceed from the intoxication of love. In the heat of summer my health requires that I. should drink in abundance to supply the amazing waste from perspiration, but, having found that I was so unexpectedly affected as I was by cool water and brandy I have determined to mix my water with less dangerous liquors. Nay, I am not only confining myself to mead, cider, beer and hock, mixed with soda w.ater, but I am accustoming myself to drink water alone. Thus if we live to see each other again you will find me most completely reformed and the soberest of the sober." In a letter of December 17, 1800, he is very loving and pleads for a favorable ending of his suit, announces that he has sent the lady a Christmas box of currants and raisins with a jug of Madeira for mince pie, and (forgetting his promised reformation) promises to drink her health in a 'glass of good Madeira at 2.30 p. m. on Christmas day and wishes her to observe the same...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 76 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 154g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236868331
  • 9781236868336