Architectural Pottery; Bricks, Tiles, Pipes, Enamelled Terra-Cottas, Ordinary and Incrusted Quarries, Stoneware Mosaics, Faiences, and Architectural S

Architectural Pottery; Bricks, Tiles, Pipes, Enamelled Terra-Cottas, Ordinary and Incrusted Quarries, Stoneware Mosaics, Faiences, and Architectural S

By (author)  , By (author) 

List price: US$20.21

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... prices as before: Masonry........ 600 cub. m. at 30 fr. = 18,000 fr. Sand or clay for filling the hollows of the masonry 200 cub. m. at I fr. 50= 300 Iron-work: 40 double iron plates bound by 20 iron tie-rods (.03 m.) with double nut... 6700 k. 224 cast-iron lids and shoulders for the coal holes. 3000 16 traps used as registers with shoulders and raising gear........ 2000 3 cast-iron openings with double sheet-iron plate for the central channel...... 300 12,000 k. at 30 fr. = 3,600 Sundries............ 100 22,000 fr. To this sum must be added for the chimney...... 5,000 The kiln works without being covered, Inn it is better to yhelter it. A simple wooden shed covered with tiles, 40 m. long and 20 m. broad, costs about 8,000 Cost of kiln with chimney and building....... 35,000 fr. If storeyed drying-rooms are required, the price is increased. A kiln constructed as above is very solid, elegant, and does not take up much room. A certain economy is effected by omitting the iron plating, and increasing the thickness of the walls. This is cheaply done by supporting the inside brick facing with buttresses between which clay is heaped up; the whole is covered with a facing of flint or rubble masonry. B. Continuous Kilns With Gas Fuel.--Historical and General Remarks.--The advantages gained by firing pottery by the combustion of gases were pointed out long ago by Ebelmen and Salvetat, who had specially in view porcelain and faTence. It was only much later, in 1869, that eminent manufacturers like Muller, Marle, etc., undertook to apply gas firing to architectural pottery, and especially to bricks. If the question seems, theoretically speaking, simple, and is presented in a seductive manner, it meets nevertheless in practice many difficulties which have...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 112 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236579402
  • 9781236579409