Architectural Composition; An Attempt to Order and Phrase Ideas Which Hitherto Have Been Only Felt by the Instinctive Taste of Designers

Architectural Composition; An Attempt to Order and Phrase Ideas Which Hitherto Have Been Only Felt by the Instinctive Taste of Designers

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ... cases are shown. In the first (a), all of the parallelograms are placed vertically; in the second (b), all are horizontal, and in both of these cases the diagonals are all parallel to each other; in the third (c), some of the parallelograms are vertical and some horizontal, making the proportions inverse, and the resulting diagonals perpendicular to each other. At Fig. 99 is an example of what has been said. In this the height of the main body of the building, from ground line to top of cornice, is almost exactly the same as its width; that is, the front closely approximates a square; each of the appendages is also nearly a square, and the diagonal lines which might be drawn would therefore be parallel. The primary parts are therefore proportionate. Observe, too, that the roofs are of the same general shape. It is true that the main roof is somewhat higher in relation to its length, but all alike are long and low rectangles, approximately proportionate to each other. A second series of proportionate rectangles exists in the door and windows, Fig. 98. Proportionate relations between parts of the first order. all of which are vertically elongated rectangles, even to the eye not numerically proportionate, notably so the secondstory windows of the main building, yet all of similar character, and some of them nearly proportionate. It is not necessary that every part of a composition should conform to the same ratio: there may be two or more sets of ratios, and certain parts that conform to each. Fig. 99. Townsend House, Washington, D. C. Excellent example of correct proportion between mass and appendages. Thus, in this instance, the mass and appendages are proportionate in one ratio, the roofs in a second, and the windows in still a third. An...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 70 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236835220
  • 9781236835222