The Architectural Antiquities of Great Britain Represented and Illustrated in a Series of Views, Elevations, Plans, Sections and Details of Ancient English Edifices; With Historical and Descriptive Accounts of Each

The Architectural Antiquities of Great Britain Represented and Illustrated in a Series of Views, Elevations, Plans, Sections and Details of Ancient English Edifices; With Historical and Descriptive Accounts of Each : In Five Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1835 edition. Excerpt: ...that they painted their bodies with blue colour, to look frightful to their enemies. J Vita Agricolae, C. XXI.--See, also, Slrabo, Lib. IV. p. 200 of the Paris Edit.--Diodorus Siculus, Lib. V. p. 209.--Mona Antiqua, p. 25--27.--King's Munimenta Antiqua, Vol. I. p. 10--12, &c. I was much gratified with an examination of this very interesting spot in the year 1802, and have given some further particulars respecting the castle, and an account of several other antiquities in that remote corner of the country, at the latter part of the Second Volume of the Beauties of England and Wales. "Hence by degrees the embryo town began. As wants or habits form'd its artless plan; The increasing numbers part the chosen spot. And each with rival toil adorns his lot; Extends his little hut, and clears around The obtruding thorns and brambles from the ground; Brings from the shatter'd tree the ponderous beam, With thatch of reeds, and rushes from the stream; Constructs, with rude design, the simple shed. From rains and tempests to protect his head; The walls with bark and pliant wattle weaves. And spreads his easy couch of wither'd leaves." Knight's "Progress or Civil Society," 4to. 1796. Dr. Stukeley has given a plan, section, and view of a building of the conical kind, which was called Arthur's Oon, or Oven, in Scotland; it was about 20 feet in height by 20 feet in diameter. Of the Anglo-Roman houses, or villas, we have both positive and analogous evidence: the first from the numerous ruins, fragments, &c. that have been found in this country, and the second from the style and character of the buildings which were prevalent in Italy and its dependent colonies, when the ambitious Romans first conquered and formed..."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 52 pages
  • 188 x 244 x 6mm | 120g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236781023
  • 9781236781024