Arboretum Et Fruticetum Britannicum; Or, the Trees and Shrubs of Britain, Native and Foreign, Hardy and Half-Hardy, Pictorially and Botanically Delineated, and Scientifically and Popularly Described with Their Propagation, Volume 4

Arboretum Et Fruticetum Britannicum; Or, the Trees and Shrubs of Britain, Native and Foreign, Hardy and Half-Hardy, Pictorially and Botanically Delineated, and Scientifically and Popularly Described with Their Propagation, Volume 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1838 edition. Excerpt: ...plants to rise 1 in. apart; and the covering, he says, should be a full inch thick. When the plants are 2 years old, they may be transplanted into nursery lines; and, after being 2 years in that situation, they may either be again transplanted in the nursery, to a greater distance apart, or removed to where they are finally to remain. Accidents, Diseases, Src. The silver fir suffers more from extreme drought than any other species of the pine and fir tribe; whole forests being occasionally destroyed in this way in the north of France and in Switzerland. When the trees are young, they arc liable to have their leading shoot injured by the frost; but this is not the case after the plants have attained the height of 5 ft. or 6 ft. The tree suffers from various insects, as has been already noticed in our general introduction, p. 2139. Statistics. Recorded Trees. The two trees at Hare field Park, planted in 1603, and one of which, in 1679, was 81 ft high, and contained 146 ft of good timber, have been already mentioned. Mitchel mentions scores of trees at Wardour Castle,11 whose aspiring heads," he Bays, were far advanced beyond all other trees there." At Longleat, he mentions a grove of 16 trees, 22 ft. apart, 110 ft high, and from 10 ft to 13 ft in circumference. Each tree contained upwards of 200 ft of timber. At the above distance of 22 ft, this would give 90 trees per acre, or 360 loads of timber; which, at the very moderate price of 3/. a load, is 1080/. In 1813, Mitchell felled three silver firs, which were Slanted in 1786: they stood in a line, 15ft. apart, and were from 100ft. to 112ft. high. Each tree ad lost its leader at 40ft high, and had formed a branchy head. The first tree contained 299 ft of timber; the second 273 ft., and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 376 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 20mm | 671g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236563492
  • 9781236563491